Longevity of Dental Implants

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If you’re in the market for an implant, or have already undergone the procedure to replace one or more teeth, you may have questions concerning the future of your newly-restored smile. Naturally, any person who has taken the time and made the investment to have an implant installed will want to do all they can to ensure that their new tooth lasts as long as possible. Our Beverly Hills dental implants dentist has all of the information you seek and the expertise needed to help you keep your implant safe, healthy, and in tact.

A dental implant consists of three main components: a titanium screw is drilled down into the bone and acts as the main body of support for the false tooth that will eventually be placed over top. Between the top and the screw is a base used to connect them, acting as the tooth to which the eventual dental crown bearing the false tooth will be placed and affixed. It is generally understood that if an implant is going to fail, it will do so immediately following the procedure, as opposed to performing well for an extended period of time only to break down later on down the line. Modern breakthroughs in the technology and technique surrounding the procedure, however, have made rejection less of a possibility than ever, making this a safer and more effective means of replacing teeth with every advancement.

The longevity of your implant will also depend on the condition your mouth was in when you had the procedure done; poor health in the mouth and body of the patient may make your bones and gums less capable of healing properly under the new imposition of the implant.

As far as a hard number in terms of the amount of time the average implant will last usably, most dentists will agree that a properly-maintained implant will remain undamaged enough to perform the same tasks as a regular tooth for decades, upwards of forty years if the patient takes care of it meticulously and doesn’t skip any in-office appointments to check up on it. What is a more pressing issue than the failure of the implanted screw itself is the possibility of the crown on top deteriorating, falling out entirely, or cracking under the pressure of day-to-day activity. This is a problem much more easily solved by your dentist than replacing the implant as a whole.

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